Daniel Reuter
PROVIDENCIA
Skinnerboox
20,7x28 cm
112 Pages

John Divola
CHROMA
Skinnerboox
24x28 cm
80 pages

[from the interview by David Campany]
Immediately after Zuma I made some rather straightforward photographs of the abandoned MGM Studios New York City back lot, in Culver City, Los Angeles.
These were in black and white.  I then decided to try something entirely different and around 1980 I started a body of work about things you can’t photograph: Gravity, Magnetism, which way water drains, and the things I see when I press my eyes with the palms of my hands. 
All of these images required the construction of some kind of visual metaphor. 



Piero Percoco
The Rainbow is Underestimated
Skinnerboox
Cover Design
Slipcase hotfoil printed

fontanesi
GRANDISSIMA SELEZIONE
13x13 cm
420 pages

Skinnerboox

Book Design
One side coated paper
Softcover with flaps


Kensuke Koike and
Thomas Sauvin
NO MORE NO LESS Skinnerboox
November 2018

One cut and folded sheet of paper
+2 Booklets
149x194mm
74 Pages


In 2015, French artist Thomas Sauvin acquired an album produced in the early 1980s by an unknown Shanghai University photography student. The album comprises original negatives, silver prints, manuscript comments from an anonymous professor, and shows the student’s diligence in mastering the rules applying to the conventional portrait. This volume was given a second life through the expert hands of Kensuke Koike, a Japanese artist based in Venice whose practice combines collage and found photography.
The series, “No More, No Less”, born from the encounter between Koike and Sauvin, includes new silver prints made from the album’s original negatives. These prints were then submitted to Koike’s sharp imagination, who, with a simple blade and adhesive tape, deconstructs and reinvents the images. However, these purely manual interventions all respect one single formal rule: nothing is removed, nothing is added, “No More, No Less”. In such a context that blends freedom and constraint, Koike and Sauvin meticulously explore the possibilities of an image only made up of itself.